Three tips to care for your body if it is aching (after physical activity).

January is cold, and there are lots of things that I do (and avoid) to keep myself cosy during the Winter season.

Some tasks can make me feel stiff, and if you are taking action to limber up this month, post could help.

New year pledges

Even though I have zero interest in the concept of new year resolutions, goal-setting or ‘new year, new you‘ ideas*, for some of you it is the opposite. You enjoy making resolutions.

Some people will be taking action and adopting a ‘full-on’ attitude for January whether it’s cold and frosty or not.

Movement for wellbeing

You might join me for yoga for or head to the gym. Some of you are involved in sport, or will take up a new activity with gusto.

Movement supports our wellbeing for sure, however physical exertion is bound to bring us aches and pains every now and then too. It’s part of the process.

Here are three tips for you

1. GET PLENTY OF SLEEP

Going to bed early and having good quality sleep is effective on so many levels.

Winding down and having a restful night will help your body’s neuroendocrine system to prepare tissues for repair. 

Sleep will bring your body into ‘rest and digest’ mode, which is the prime state for relief from muscle aches to happen.[iii]

2. DRINK MORE WATER.

Water is life. Always aim to keep hydrated. Drink even more on the days that you feel tender. Water will aid your recovery.

I never drink water ice cold. Sipping it at room temperature, or warm, is kinder to my gut.

3. MOVE

Even though it might seem like the last thing you want to do if you are full of aches, movement can ease physical tightness. 

Just take it easy. Slow yoga asana or an uphill hike will limber you up again. Nothing too strenuous is required.

Yoga

There are endless robust studies showing the benefits of yoga.  Most people do not have a full yoga practice. They apply asana (physical poses) as exercise. This is the first stage.

Yoga can reduce pain and ease disability.  Even in people patients with chronic low back pain it can be practiced safely [iv]. The key word here is ‘safe’.

Slow and steady is always best, so always listen to your body. Bí curamach.**

Till next time,

take care.

-Kathryn.

*If you would like to know more about why I have avoided January trends for the last 11 years sign up to my newsletter to read an interesting article.

** Bí curamach, pronounced ‘be coor-am-och’ is the Irish phrase for ‘be careful’.

About me

As a writer and yoga teacher, I am fascinated by the human body as well as our capacity for self-expression and healing.


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